Random Thoughts

What mistake?

lb_eighteenth_day_of_december

 

I had been looking forward to today’s piece ever since I started tatting this series of snowflakes. I absolutely love the pattern! Just look at how cleverly the elements are placed – it is like trick art, looking like trefoils one moment, then like hexagons the next.

 

And it is so ingeniously designed that it can be made in one take. Yet, the techniques required to make this piece were fairly basic (just simple and split rings). Thinking that I would be able to get it done without spending too much time on it, I decided to tat something else before it… something for the holiday season, with a couple of other techniques I have been wanting to try out.

 

Maybe I used up all my attention on this other piece and lost my concentration after it was completed.

Or maybe I took today’s snowflake too lightly, erroneously assuming it was an easy piece.

Maybe it was both.

 

About a third of the way into it, I realized I mistaken the amount of thread I needed to load on my shuttles – I had too much on one and too little on the other! I was horrified… do I need to throw away what I have already done and restart (but it is always heartbreaking to do so), or cut and tie and reload anew when the thread runs out on one shuttle (and desecrate this heavenly design) while I have a long piece remaining on the other (and wonder what on earth I will do with it)?

 

So I browsed the web, madly searching for a solution… and I found one! It was quite an advanced technique for a novice like me (single shuttle split rings with the first half being made with both shuttles). But I thought learning it would be a much better choice than any other I could come up with.

 

Maybe I stubbornly did not wish to admit I had made a mistake?

Or maybe I just wanted to prove that necessity really is the mother of invention?

Maybe it was both.

 

Whatever my motive was, the bottom line is, I just about succeeded in covering up the mistake:

 

lb_eighteenth_day_of_december_remainder

Today’s piece, with the thread that remained on the two shuttles in the end… almost as planned!

 

Maybe a mistake is not a mistake until you make it so.

Maybe they are challenges that can make or break you.

And maybe what does not break you will make you stronger.

So, I shall strongly avow – what mistake? There were no mistakes, it was all a challenge to make me a better tatter!

 

By the way, the other piece was this beaded Celtic wreath:

 

rl_easy_celtic_tatted_wreath

 

The beads are pink not by mistake, I just didn’t have any red ones in stock. But I hope it still gets the message across… season’s greetings, warmest wishes, have a wonderful holiday season!

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7 thoughts on “What mistake?

  1. =Snowflake=
    Pattern: “Eighteenth Day of December” by L.B.
    Thread: Lizbeth by Handy Hands (cotton lace thread, size #80, colour #157 “Raspberry Frappe” – variegated medium raspberry pink, dark boysenberry, medium and light magenta)
    Size: about 7 centimetres or slightly over 2 3/4 inches

    =Wreath=
    Pattern: “Easy Celtic Tatted Wreath” by R.L. (the original pattern is without beads)
    Thread: Daruma Home Thread by Yokota (cotton hand sewing thread, size #30, colour #26 – dark green)
    Beads: Miyuki delica beads (size 11/0, colour #75 – pink)
    Size: about 3 centimetres or slightly less than 1 1/4 inches

    Like

  2. They both look gorgeous! A lovely snowflake and a charming wreath.
    For the one where you were running out of thread on one shuttle, something else you could try is the shoelace trick, which effectively swaps the shuttles. It’s used a lot to change colours when working with two colours.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Don’t we all! But whereas I used to not realize my measurements were wrong until I couldn’t go on any further, I now notice it while I can still do something to fix it… and with the trick you’ve pointed me to, I don’t think I’ll ever admit to making mistakes on thread requirement XD

        Like

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